The Best KPIs to Track in a Digital Marketing Campaign

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are benchmarks that can help you evaluate the success of your campaigns.

By measuring the effectiveness of your marketing efforts, you can:

  • identify areas where your strategy may need improvement
  • develop data-driven plans to increase performance.

KPIs provide tangible metrics that allow you, or your digital marketing agency, to make informed decisions based on data.

In this article, we’ll dive deeper into marketing KPIs and explore how you can leverage them to set measurable objectives.


What are Key Performance Indicators?

As mentioned earlier, KPIs are quantitative data measures of the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns.

While there are hundreds of KPIs out there, you’ve likely already been exposed to common ones!

For example, Google Analytics often reports on bounce rates, Shopify and BigCommerce often report on conversion rates, and MailChimp and other email sending platforms often report on open rate.

These are all examples of key performance indicators people use to establish baselines on performance before attempting improvements to their digital marketing.


How to Choose the Right KPIs for Your Digital Marketing

Selecting the right KPIs is crucial for the success of both local businesses and ecommerce companies.

For local businesses, common KPIs may include metrics such as website traffic, online reviews, social media engagement, and local search ranking. These KPIs can help measure the effectiveness of local SEO, social media management, and online reputation management efforts.

For ecommerce companies, common KPIs may include metrics such as website traffic, conversion rates, average order value, and customer acquisition cost. These KPIs can help measure the effectiveness of ecommerce marketing strategies, including search engine marketing, email marketing, and social media marketing.

When selecting KPIs, it’s important to ensure they align with the overall business goals and objectives. For example, if the goal is to increase sales, KPIs related to revenue and conversion rates should be prioritized.

It’s also important to find KPIs that you can easily measure within existing toolsets. You can easily start by looking at what KPIs are reported within your website platform, SEO auditing tools, paid ads platform, or analytics tools.

The reason we mention that is some of the KPIs listed below are going to be more difficult to calculate and track over time. We just don’t want to see you get frustrated and give up on tracking data and improving results.


Ultimate List of Digital Marketing KPIs

Website Engagement KPIs

These are metrics used to measure how engaging your website and content is to visitors.

  1. Website Traffic: Website traffic refers to the number of visitors that come to your website. You should pay particular attention to how people are coming to your website to ensure you are bringing quality traffic that is looking for the products or services you offer.
  2. Time Spent on Site: Time spent on site refers to the amount of time on average a visitor spends on your website. This can indicate the interest level in your content or the attractiveness of your website’s design.
  3. Pages Per Session: Pages per session refers to the average number of pages a user views during a single session on a website. A high pages per session metric is typically caused by engaging content and a user-friendly design, while a low metric may indicate difficulty finding information or a lack of value for the user.
  4. Bounce Rate: Bounce rate refers to the percentage of visitors who leave a website after viewing only one page. A high bounce rate can be caused by factors such as irrelevant content, poor user experience, or slow page load times. A low bounce rate may be due to engaging content and effective calls-to-action that encourage visitors to explore more of the website. Your bounce rate could be low simply because you answered someone’s question or provided alternative contact methods on the page they first encountered.
  5. New vs. Returning Visitors: This refers to the percentage of visitors who are new to the website versus those who have visited before. A high percentage of returning visitors can indicate a loyal customer base and engaging content that encourages repeat visits. A high percentage of new visitors may indicate successful marketing campaigns and a growing audience. A balance between new and returning visitors is ideal for sustained growth and success. The metric is dependent upon cookie-based tracking.
  6. Geographic Location of Visitors: Geographic location of visitors refers to the physical location of website visitors, typically determined by their IP address. This can be inaccurate for people on VPN connections or mobile networks. It is important to ensure most of your website traffic is coming for geographic areas where you do business.
  7. Mobile Traffic: Mobile traffic refers to website visitors who access your website using a mobile device such as a smartphone or tablet, rather than a desktop computer. Most websites should see at least 50% of their traffic coming from mobile devices.
  8. Desktop Traffic: Desktop traffic refers to website visitors who access the site using a desktop or laptop computer, rather than a mobile device. Most websites should see slightly less than half of their traffic coming from desktop devices, with an exception for B2B websites that are often more visited in workplaces.
  9. Top Pages Viewed: Top pages viewed refers to the pages on a website that are most frequently viewed by visitors. This is often influenced by what pages rank the best for you in search engines.
  10. Conversion Rate: Conversion rate refers to the percentage of website visitors who take a desired action, such as making a purchase or filling out a form. Within Google Analytics, you can set goals for any number of desired actions that can be treated and measured as a conversion. These don’t have to be sales related.
  11. Cost Per Conversion / Action: Cost per conversion refers to the average cost incurred to acquire a customer who completes a desired action, such as making a purchase or filling out a contact form. This will vary wildly between industries and conversions. For example, the cost to acquire an HVAC lead will be much less than a car sales lead because of the purchase price, time to purchase, etc.
  12. Click-Through Rate: Click-through rate (CTR) refers to the percentage of clicks on a particular link or ad, relative to the total number of impressions it receives. In general, a good benchmark for CTR is around 2-3% for display ads and 4-5% for search ads. Check out our simple CTR calculator to help you do the math!
  13. Cost Per Click: Cost per click (CPC) refers to the cost incurred by an advertiser each time a user clicks on one of their ads. A high CPC can be caused by factors such as high competition for keywords or placements, low ad relevance or quality, or a low click-through rate (CTR). You betcha, we’ve got a CPC calculator to help you figure this out too!
  14. Impressions: Impressions refer to the number of times an ad has been displayed to users. A high number of impressions can be caused by factors such as a large target audience, high ad spend, or frequent ad placement.
  15. Time on Page: Time on page refers to the amount of time visitors spend on a specific page of a website. A high time on page metric can be caused by factors such as engaging content, clear calls-to-action, and easy navigation, while a low time on page may indicate that visitors are not finding the content relevant or valuable, or that the page layout and design is not user-friendly.
  16. Scroll Depth: Scroll depth refers to how far users scroll down a page on a website. A high scroll depth can indicate that users are highly engaged with the content and are interested in exploring more, while a low scroll depth may indicate that users are not finding the content valuable or engaging enough to continue reading.
  17. Exit Rate: Exit rate refers to the percentage of visitors who leave a website from a specific page, relative to the total number of visits to that page. A high exit rate can be caused by factors such as poor user experience, irrelevant / confusing content, or a lack of clear calls-to-action.

Website Traffic KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the source and amount of traffic a website receives.

  1. Organic Traffic: Organic traffic refers to website visitors who arrive at a site through unpaid, natural search engine results. This is heavily influenced by the quality of your search engine optimization efforts.
  2. Paid Traffic: Paid traffic refers to website visitors who arrive at a site through paid advertising, such as pay-per-click (PPC) ads or display ads. This is heavily influenced by the quality of your paid advertising campaigns on Facebook, Instagram, Google, Bing, LinkedIn, etc.
  3. Referral Traffic: Referral traffic refers to website visitors who arrive at a site through external sources such as links from other websites. This often doesn’t refer to traffic coming from social media channels. However, it might include traffic from message board advertisements that are being run outside of ad platforms like Google or Bing.
  4. Direct Traffic: Direct traffic refers to website visitors who arrive at a site by typing in the website URL directly into their browser. This is often more common for websites that have easy to remember domain names. If someone types your business name into the URL bar, it might show a search result that would be counted as organic or paid traffic though.
  5. Social Traffic: Social traffic refers to website visitors who arrive at a site through social media platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn. This does not include paid traffic from these platforms.

Conversion KPIs (ecommerce sales, lead generation, etc)

These are metrics used to measure the converting actions visitors take on your website, such as placing orders, filling contact forms, subscribing to newsletters, downloading content, etc. You’ll want to pay attention to these KPIs during any CRO service.

  1. Cart Abandonment Rate: Cart abandonment rate refers to the percentage of online shoppers who add items to their shopping cart but do not complete the purchase. A high cart abandonment rate can be caused by factors such as unexpected shipping costs or a lack of trust in the website or brand.
  2. Checkout Abandonment Rate: Checkout abandonment rate refers to the percentage of online shoppers who initiate the checkout process but do not complete the purchase. A high checkout abandonment rate can be caused by factors such as a complicated checkout process, coupon code issues, or unexpected fees.
  3. Customer Lifetime Value: Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) refers to the total amount of revenue a customer is expected to generate for a business over the course of their relationship. A high CLV can be caused by factors such as high customer retention rates, repeat purchases, and cross-selling or upselling strategies that increase customer spend. We made this helpful CLV calculator to help you do the math easily.
  4. Customer Acquisition Cost: Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) refers to the total cost incurred by a business to acquire a new customer. A high CAC can be caused by factors such as high advertising costs, low conversion rates, or a lack of effective targeting.
  5. Return on Investment: Return on Investment (ROI) refers to the profitability of a marketing campaign relative to its cost. A high ROI can be caused by factors such as high revenue and profit margins stemming from the low cost of goods sold, efficient use of resources, or low competition.
  6. Churn Rate: Churn rate refers to the percentage of customers or subscribers who cancel or do not renew their service or subscription over a specific period of time. A high churn rate can be caused by factors such as poor customer service, low product or service quality, high prices, or strong competition. We made a helpful tool so you can easily calculate your churn rate.
  7. Average Order Value: Average Order Value (AOV) refers to the average amount spent per transaction by customers. A high AOV can be caused by factors such as effective cross-selling or upselling strategies, a wide product range with varying price points, or high customer loyalty and repeat purchases.
  8. Product Conversion Rate: Product conversion rate refers to the percentage of visitors to a product page who make a purchase. A high product conversion rate can be caused by factors such as high product demand, effective product descriptions and images, positive reviews and ratings, or competitive pricing. Need help figuring out your conversion rate, check out this helpful tool.
  9. Landing Page Conversion Rate: Landing Page Conversion Rate refers to the percentage of visitors who take a desired action on a landing page, such as filling out a form or making a purchase. A high landing page conversion rate can be caused by factors such as effective design and messaging, clear call-to-action, or relevant content.
  10. Net Revenue: Net revenue refers to the total revenue generated by a business, minus any associated costs or expenses. A high net revenue can be caused by factors such as high sales volume, strong profit margins, or efficient cost management.
  11. Gross Revenue: Gross revenue refers to the total revenue generated by a business before deducting any associated costs or expenses. A high gross revenue can be caused by factors such as high sales volume, high product or service demand, or strong pricing strategies.
  12. Net Profit Margin: Net profit margin refers to the percentage of revenue that remains as profit after all associated costs and expenses have been deducted. A high net profit margin can be caused by factors such as high revenue, low expenses, or efficient cost management.
  13. Gross Profit Margin: Gross profit margin refers to the percentage of revenue that remains as profit after deducting the cost of goods sold (COGS) but before deducting any other associated costs or expenses. A high gross profit margin can be caused by factors such as high sales volume, efficient cost of goods sold management, or effective pricing strategies.
  14. Cost of Goods Sold: Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) refers to the total cost incurred by a business to produce or purchase the goods sold. A high COGS can be caused by factors such as high material or labor costs, inefficient production processes, or supply chain disruptions.
  15. Average Revenue Per User: Average Revenue Per User (ARPU) refers to the average revenue generated by each customer or user. A high ARPU can be caused by factors such as high customer spending, effective pricing strategies, or cross-selling and upselling.
  16. Customer Retention Rate: Customer retention rate refers to the percentage of customers who continue to do business with a company over a specific period. A high customer retention rate can be caused by factors such as strong customer loyalty, effective customer service, or high product or service quality.
  17. Referral Rate: Referral rate refers to the percentage of customers who refer new customers to a company. A high referral rate can be caused by factors such as strong customer loyalty, effective referral programs, or high product or service quality.
  18. Customer Referral Value (CRV): Customer Referral Value (CRV) refers to the total value generated by a customer over their lifetime because of referring new customers to a company. A high CRV can be caused by factors such as high referral rates, strong customer loyalty, or high customer lifetime value.
  19. Time to Conversion: Time to Conversion refers to the average time it takes for a visitor to a website or landing page to convert into a customer or take a desired action, such as making a purchase or filling out a form. A high time to conversion may be caused by factors such as a complicated or confusing conversion process, lack of urgency or incentives to convert, or a longer consideration period for the product or service.
  20. Lead Quality: Lead Quality refers to the likelihood of a lead to convert into a paying customer, based on factors such as demographics, behavior, and engagement. A high lead quality may be caused by factors such as strong engagement with a company’s content or brand, clear fit with the company’s target customer persona, or high intent to purchase.
  21. Lead Source: Lead Source refers to the origin or channel through which a lead is generated, such as organic search, social media, or email marketing. A high lead source metric for a particular channel may be caused by factors such as strong targeting and messaging for that channel, high visibility and reach, or effective use of promotions and incentives.
  22. Top Converting Landing Pages: Top Converting Landing Pages refers to the performance of landing pages in terms of their ability to convert visitors into customers or desired actions, ranked by their conversion rate. A high metric may be caused by factors such as effective design and messaging, clear call-to-action, or relevant and engaging content.
  23. Top Exit Pages: Top Exit Pages refers to the pages on a website or app where visitors are most likely to leave or exit, ranked by the exit rate. A high metric may be caused by factors such as poor user experience, lack of relevance or engagement, or technical issues.
  24. Webinar Registrations: Webinar Registrations refers to the number of people who register for a live or recorded online seminar or presentation. A high Webinar Registrations metric may be caused by factors such as effective promotion and targeting, engaging and relevant content, or incentivized registration.
  25. Webinar Attendance Rate: Webinar Attendance Rate refers to the percentage of registered attendees who attend a live or recorded online seminar or presentation. A high Webinar Attendance Rate may be caused by factors such as effective reminders and follow-up communication, engaging and relevant content, or incentives for attendance.

How to Boost Your Website Conversions

Google Ads KPIs (or Bing Ads)

These are metrics used to measure the performance of a Google Ads campaign.

  1. Ad Position: Ad position refers to the order in which a paid advertisement appears on a search engine results page or other digital platform. A high Ad Position metric may be caused by factors such as a high bid or quality score, strong relevance to the search query or target audience, or low competition.
  2. Impression Share: Search Impression Share refers to the percentage of impressions your ads receive compared to the total number of impressions you are eligible to receive, which can indicate opportunities to increase your ad visibility.
  3. Quality Score: Quality score refers to the relevance and quality of a paid ad in relation to the user’s search query. A high quality score may be caused by factors such as relevant ad copy and landing page content, high click-through rates, and strong user experience.

Facebook Ads KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the performance of a Facebook Ads campaign.

  1. Ad Reach: Ad reach refers to the number of unique individuals who have been exposed to a particular ad. High ad reach may be caused by factors such as a large target audience, effective targeting and segmentation strategies, strong engagement, or good shareability of the ad content.
  2. Frequency: Frequency refers to the average number of times an individual has been exposed to a particular ad or campaign. A high frequency metric is often not desirable and may be caused by factors such as a small target audience, low ad variety and rotation, or high impression rates.
  3. Relevance Score: Relevance Score refers to the quality and relevance of your ads to your target audience, which can affect your ad delivery and cost.
  4. Return on Ad Spend: Return on Ad Spend (ROAS) refers to the revenue generated for every dollar spent on advertising. A high ROAS metric indicates that a company is generating significant revenue from its advertising spend, which is typically caused by factors such as effective targeting, strong messaging, and good ad placement. We made a tool to help you calculate your ROAS.
  5. Cost Per Action: Cost Per Action (CPA) refers to the average cost of each desired action, such as a purchase or lead form completion. This is often used by Facebook to optimize your bids and budget for maximum ROI. Check out our CPA calculator to help you figure out this metric.
  6. Cost Per Thousand Impressions: Cost Per Thousand Impressions (CPM) refers to the cost of displaying an ad 1,000 times. A high CPM metric may be caused by various factors such as high competition for ad space, targeting a narrow audience, or running ads during peak hours. Use our CPM calculator to help you get this answer!

SEO KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the performance of a search engine optimization campaign.

  1. Keyword Rankings: Keyword rankings refer to the position of a website in search engine results pages (SERPs) for a particular keyword or phrase. A high ranking is typically desired and achieved through effective search engine optimization efforts. In some situations, you may see this metric referred to as Total Keyword Rankings, which often refers to the total keywords you rank for in SERPs between positions 1-100.
  2. Referring Domains: Referring domains refer to the number of unique external websites linking to your website. A high metric indicates your website has quality backlinks from many websites, which can positively impact your keyword rankings.
  3. Total Backlinks: Total backlinks refer to the number of external links pointing to your website, with multiples from one website still being counted. A high metric is desirable for the same reasons as Referring Domains, if you don’t have an abnormally high number of backlinks from too many single domains.
  4. Domain Rating: Domain Rating (DR) is a metric developed by Ahrefs that indicates the overall strength of a website’s backlink profile. A high DR typically indicates a strong backlink profile from authoritative websites.
  5. Domain Authority: Domain Authority (DA) is a metric developed by Moz that predicts a website’s ability to rank on search engine results pages, with a high DA indicating a higher likelihood of ranking.
  6. Page Speed: Page speed refers to how fast a web page loads and displays content to users. A high metric indicates the page loads quickly, which can be a factor in keyword rankings. People often utilize Google PageSpeed Insights to obtain this metric.

Email Marketing KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the performance of an email marketing campaign.

  1. Open Rate: Email open rate refers to the percentage of recipients who opened an email marketing message. A high open rate is often attributed to a compelling subject line, relevant content, and an engaged email list, while a low open rate may indicate poor email list hygiene or irrelevant content.
  2. Click-to-Open Rate: Click-To-Open Rate (CTOR) refers to the percentage of email recipients who click on a link in the email out of those who opened the email. A high CTOR can be caused by a well-crafted subject line and engaging email content.
  3. Click-Through Rate: Email Click Through Rate (CTR) refers to the percentage of email recipients who click on a link or call-to-action within an email. A high CTR is often attributed to well-crafted and targeted emails with clear and compelling CTAs, while a low metric can be caused by irrelevant content, poor design, or unengaging subject lines.
  4. Unsubscribe Rates: Email unsubscribe rate refers to the percentage of recipients who unsubscribe from an email list after receiving a marketing email. A high email unsubscribe rate could be caused by irrelevant, excessive, or poorly designed email content.
  5. List Growth Rate: List growth rate refers to the rate at which a mailing list is growing over time. A high growth rate is typically caused by effective lead generation tactics such as offering valuable incentives.
  6. Subscriber Lifetime Value: Subscriber lifetime value refers to the average financial value of a subscribers in your marketing lists. A high lifetime value is typically the result of a combination of factors including subscriber engagement, retention, product offerings, and purchase frequency.
  7. Email Conversion Rate: Email Conversion Rate refers to the percentage of email recipients who take the desired action, such as making a purchase or filling out a form. A high metric is often attributed to a clear call-to-action, relevant content, and effective email design.
  8. Forward Rate: Email forward rate refers to the percentage of email recipients who forward a particular email message to others, indicating the level of interest and engagement with the content.

Social Media Management KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the performance of a social media management campaign.

  1. Social Media Engagement: Social media engagement refers to the interactions and activity that take place onyour social media profiles. This includes likes, comments, shares, and any other form of engagement your users take. High levels of engagement can help increase brand awareness, build relationships with followers, and drive traffic to your website.
  2. Ad Engagement Rate: Ad Engagement Rate refers to the percentage of users who engage with your social media advertisements by clicking, liking, commenting, or sharing. The target for this metric would be a high percentage of user engagement, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.
  3. Followers: Followers refers to the number of users who have chosen to subscribe to your social media account to receive updates on your activities and content. Determining a good following will depend on the goals of the brand and the specific social media platform being used. For example, on TikTok, a good result might be a high number of followers who are actively engaging with your content. On YouTube, a good result might be a high number of subscribers who are relevant to your industry or niche.
  4. Likes: Likes refer to the number of times users have clicked the “Like” button on your brand’s social media posts. This KPI is used to measure the level of engagement and interest that your content is generating among followers. A high amount of likes indicates your content is resonating with your audience and generating interest in your brand.
  5. Shares: Shares refer to the number of times users have shared your brand’s social media posts with their own followers. This KPI is used to measure the level of engagement and interest your content is generating among its audience, and can help increase the reach of my brand’s content. A high amount of shares indicates your content is resonating with your audience.
  6. Comments: Comments refer to the number of responses, feedback, or questions from your followers on your social media posts. A good outcome would be a high number of relevant and engaging comments that show interaction and interest in your content.
  7. Mentions: Mentions refer to the number of times your brand is talked about by users on social media, blogs, or other online platforms. The target metric would be a high number of relevant and positive mentions that show a strong brand reputation and engagement.
  8. Click-Through Rate: Click Through Rate (CTR) refers to the percentage of users who click on a link or call-to-action within a social media post or advertisement, which is an indication of the effectiveness of your content or advertising. A high CTR indicates strong user engagement and interest.
  9. Follower Growth: Follower Growth refers to the rate at which your social media following is increasing over a given period of time, which is an indication of your brand’s reach and popularity. A steady increase in your following indicates a strong brand presence and content strategy.
  10. Influencer Reach: Influencer Reach refers to the number of unique users who have been exposed to your brand’s content through an influencer’s social media account. A high number of unique users reached indicates a successful influencer partnership and effective message delivery.
  11. Social Listening Volume: Social listening value refers to the insights and feedback gained by monitoring and analyzing online conversations about your brand or industry. A good metric would be a high level of positive sentiment and valuable insights gained, which can help inform your brand strategy and improve customer satisfaction.
  12. Share of Voice: Share of voice refers to the percentage of online conversations or mentions in your industry that your brand is part of online. Having your voice in a high percentage of online conversations or mentions indicates a strong brand presence and industry authority.
  13. Sentiment: Sentiment refers to the positive or negative tone of online conversations or mentions about your brand or industry. A good sentiment would be a high level of positive sentiment, which indicates strong customer satisfaction and brand reputation.
  14. Ad Impressions: Ad Impressions refers to the number of times your social media ads have been shown to users. A high amount of impressions indicates a strong potential reach and brand visibility.
  15. Ad Clicks: Ad Clicks refers to the number of times users have clicked on your social media advertisements. A good metric would be a high number of clicks, which indicates strong user engagement and interest in your brand or product.
  16. Video Views: Video Views refers to the number of times users have viewed your social media videos. The target for this metric would be a high number of views, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.
  17. Average View Duration: Average View Duration refers to the average length of time users have watched your social media videos. The target would be a high average duration, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.
  18. Completion Rate: Completion Rate refers to the percentage of users who have watched your social media video to completion. The target metric would be a high percentage of users who watch your video to completion, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.
  19. Cost Per Video View: Cost Per Video View (CPV) refers to the cost of each individual video view for your social media advertising campaign. The target metric would be a low cost per view, which indicates efficient use of your advertising budget and a high return on investment.
  20. Video Shares: Video Shares refers to the number of times users have shared your social media videos. The target metric would be a high number of shares, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.
  21. Video Engagement Rate: Video Engagement Rate refers to the percentage of users who engage with your social media videos by clicking, liking, commenting, sharing or watching to completion. The target metric would be a high percentage of user engagement, which indicates strong user interest and potential for conversions.

Customer Satisfaction KPIs

These are metrics used to measure the performance of your customer service team, which plays an important role in the ROI you’ll see from digital marketing.

  1. Customer Reviews: Customer Reviews refer to the feedback given by customers after using a product or service. These reviews could be made on third-party websites like Google My Business, Yelp, or BBB. The reviews could also be placed on product pages of your website.
  2. Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT): Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT) refers to the level of satisfaction customers have with a company’s products, services, or overall experience. A high CSAT can be caused by factors such as high-quality products or services, effective customer service, or positive customer experiences.
  3. Net Promoter Score: Net Promoter Score (NPS) refers to the likelihood of customers to recommend a business to others, typically on a scale of 0 to 10. A high NPS can be caused by factors such as strong customer service, high product or service quality, and effective marketing and branding.
  4. Time to Respond: Time to Respond refers to the time it takes a business to reply to customer inquiries, such as emails or messages. A low metric is desirable as it shows that the business values and responds to customer inquiries promptly, providing better customer service.
  5. Customer Service Resolution Time: Customer service resolution time refers to the length of time it takes for a customer’s inquiry or issue to be resolved by a company’s customer service team. A lower metric indicates a more efficient and effective customer service department.
  6. Customer Service Satisfaction Score: Customer Service Satisfaction Score refers to how satisfied customers are with their overall experience with customer service. A high score indicates a positive customer experience.
  7. Average Handle Time: Average Handle Time (AHT) refers to the average time a customer service representative spends on a single customer interaction. A high metric could be caused by complex issues or inadequate training, while a low metric could indicate rushed service or incomplete issue resolution.
  8. First Call Resolution Rate: First Call Resolution Rate refers to the percentage of customer issues resolved during the initial contact with customer support, and a high rate is achieved by having well-trained staff and efficient processes in place.
  9. Chat Response Time: Chat response time refers to the time taken by a customer service agent to respond to a chat message from a customer. A low metric is preferred as it indicates quick and efficient customer service.
  10. Chat Completion Rate: Chat Completion Rate refers to the percentage of chat sessions that were successfully completed with a resolution or outcome. A high completion rate is typically attributed to effective communication and problem-solving skills of the chat agents.
  11. Chat Satisfaction Score: Chat Satisfaction Score refers to the level of customer satisfaction with a chat support interaction. This is often measured through a survey or feedback mechanism at the end of a chat, with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction with the support experience.

Final Thoughts on KPIs within Digital Marketing

Digital marketing KPIs play a critical role in measuring the success of your marketing efforts.

By tracking metrics such as website traffic, conversion rates, cost per acquisition, return on investment, social media engagement, or email open rates, you can gain insights into the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns and make informed decisions about how to improve them.

However, it’s important to remember that KPIs are not the be-all and end-all of your marketing strategy. They are just one part of a larger picture, and should be viewed in conjunction with other metrics and qualitative data to provide a comprehensive view of your marketing performance.

By leveraging KPIs alongside other data-driven approaches, you can create a more successful and impactful internet marketing strategy for your business or organization.


Disclaimer: WebCitz, LLC does not warrant or make any representations concerning the accuracy, likely results, or reliability of the information found on this page or on any web sites linked to from this page. This blog article was written by David W in his or her personal capacity. The opinion(s) expressed in this article are the author's own and may not reflect the opinion(s) of WebCitz, LLC.