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Product Page Examples for Optimized Conversion: Complete with Guide

Product Page Examples for Optimized Conversion

Imagine this: It’s late at night and you find yourself on the web. You’re searching for the perfect solution to the problem that has been nagging at you all week. You’ve been here before. Slouched, head in hands, and sleep is knocking at your door. Just before all hope is lost, Eureka! You finally get a promising search result. With bated breath, you click and…

Nothing happens. After an eternity, a white screen begins to render with walls of text and a single, tiny pixelated product image. Flashbacks from the age of dial-up fill your mind. You scan the page for some remedy, but you’re met with no price info, no customer reviews, and multiple phone numbers telling you to call for more information. Not a working link insight, and their only social proof is an animation of a cat telling you this product is “Purrrrfect!” It’s painfully apparent: you’ve stumbled into a website graveyard.

Don’t let this nightmare be your store! The best user experiences come from websites that are engaging and regularly updated, rather than sites that leave the user wondering if they should run their anti-virus software. Whether you’re just getting started or you’re looking to give your ecommerce store an update, we’re here to help!

In this article, we’ll go over the minimum criteria that every product page should have, as well as some design choices to avoid. We’ve even put together a collection of our favorite product pages with a quick pros and cons list for each to help inspire your next project!


Building the Perfect Product Page

The purpose of your product page is to, well, sell your product! But it’s also about understanding what your visitors expect your website to do for them. The average person in the US spends seven hours and 50 minutes per day on the internet. With so much time each day invested in looking at different websites, people visiting your site will treat their experience the same way a first-class sommelier would critique a bottle of wine. Your visitors are highly capable of picking up on the nuances between a good experience and a bad one. 

Not only should your product page include the fundamentals your visitors have come to expect, but it should provide a frictionless user experience while also including your own unique flair that will keep them coming back.

Meeting the expectations of your users can feel like walking a tight rope if you aren’t sure what they’re looking for. This is why we put together a guide outlining best and worst practices for designing your product page that will help you engage with users and ultimately increase your conversion rate.

Product Page Best Practices

There is a lot that goes into making brilliant product pages, so we’ve created a list of product page features and concepts that we find the most important to improving your visitor’s experience when used tastefully.

  • Clean URL
  • Captivating name
  • Transparent and upfront pricing information
  • High visibility Call to Actions (CTA’s)
  • Item availability
  • Distinct product options
  • Clear product pictures with multiple camera angles, situations, and models
  • Ability to compare similar products
  • “Add to favorites/wishlist” button
  • High quality, web optimized images, videos, and gifs
  • FAQ section
  • Zoom functionality
  • Augmented reality
  • 360° view
  • Vivid product descriptions
  • Live chat feature
  • A mixture of product and lifestyle media for story narration
  • Responsive design
  • Relevant “related products” section
  • “Upsell” section
  • Ability to increase the quantity of product
  • Size/fit guide (if applicable)
  • Seamless navigation
  • Intuitive filter options
  • Sticky “Back to Top” button
  • Highly accessible to differently-abled users
  • Upfront shipping and return policies
  • Sticky “Add to Cart” or “Buy Now” buttons
  • Social proof
  • Extended details (materials, technical specs, dimensions, weight, special features, etc.
  • No redundancy
  • A spacious and interesting font
  • Quick load times
  • Cross-browser functionality
  • Dark mode friendly

One word of caution- be careful of feature creep. This is when a page takes on so many unnecessary features that it ends up harming the overall user experience. An augmented reality feature might not help a company that sells toothpicks, but it would help a company that sells large furniture. Be sure to take the time to evaluate which features could help showcase your product better without adding everything under the sun to your page.

Product Page Worst Practices

As you start to implement the best practices into your site, you should be mindful of some of the worst practices listed below. These concepts can range in severity from confusing users by using the hyperlink blue font color for normal text, to something more malicious, like sneaking unwanted items into a person’s shopping cart.

  • Too many colors
  • Convoluted price
  • Inconsistent design
  • Bait and switch tactics
  • Hide additional fees
  • Too long/too short or copied description
  • Inconsistent product names
  • False guarantees
  • Recommend non-relevant products
  • Burying call to actions
  • Small & poor quality images, videos, gifs
  • Negative talk/social proof
  • Reoccuring pop-ups
  • Confirmshaming
  • Sneaking items into your cart
  • Unclear navigation
  • Compact font
  • Busy negative space
  • No FAQ
  • No social proof

Top 25 Product Pages

Groove Life

What We Liked

  • Very informative and easy solution to finding out your ring size.
  • Great social pressure (Instragram feed, reviews)
  • Description is easily digestable.

What We Didn’t Like

  • Price is not clear
  • Could use a sticky “Buy Now” button on desktop
  • Doesn’t use any upsell techniques
Groove Life ring product page

Yeti

What We Liked

  • Neat feature where it’ll show you the closest location you can buy 
  • Unique typography
  • Consistent branding

What We Didn’t Like

  • Large useless whitespace under photo gallery
  • Obnoxiously large sticky “buy now” section
  • No use of videos or gifs
Yeti water bottle

Simple Human

What We Liked

  • Great navigation tool on the left side of the screen
  • The review section goes left and right rather than expanding up and down, using less real estate
  • Great use of images to sell features and story

What We Didn’t Like

  • No sticky “buy now” button
  • No upsell section when they specialize in a trash system/ecosystem
  • Colors for CTA, headers, reviews, and images/badges didn’t blend.
Simple Human trash can

Decked

What We Liked

  • Page facilitates a sense of community among buyers with great social proof
  • Lots of CTAs
  • Typography fits the brand’s voice with icons to match

What We Didn’t Like

  • Product images could have been integrated above the fold better
  • Large white space by the FAQ
  • Lacks any sticky header, “Buy Now” button, or way to jump to the top
Decked truck storage

Nanoleaf

What We Liked

  • Sticky header includes navigation and the “Shop” button, which also hides when you scroll down.
  • Awesome scroll animation above the fold
  • Excellent story building through images
  • Page title changes when you switch tabs

What We Didn’t Like

  • Dynamic Glowing Effect section is missing a video
  • Video could have played without opening up a window
  • Large, unused whitespace under the fold
Nano Leaf illuminated wall art

Related: Ecommerce Product Page Design Services by WebCitz


Quip

What We Liked

  • Upsell, upsell, and even more upsell!!
  • Great use of colors
  • Good use of gifs rather than still images

What We Didn’t Like

  • Inconsistent price
  • The review section takes you away from the product page and lacks social proof
  • Hidden warranty/return/shipping policy, could use links for further reading
Quip toothbrush

DBrand

What We Liked

  • Great customization options that are reflected in the product images.
  • Fantastic storytelling told by the brand’s unapologetically abrasive voice.
  • Scroll animation with high res photos keeps the user engaged

What We Didn’t Like1200

  • Very limited calls to action
  • No upsells or cross-sells, only one suggestive sell
  • No sticky header or sticky “Add to Cart” button
Dbrand phone case

Vessi

What We Liked

  • Excellent animations, especially the exploding shoe animation
  • Nice sticky header with “Add to Cart” button
  • Fantastic review section that you can be expanded

What We Didn’t Like

  • Instagram feed could have been interactive
  • Images could have zoomed in on hover rather than on click
  • Sticky header could have allowed you to change the color
Vessi running shoes

Marucci

What We Liked

  • Extensive customization that updates the product image based on your chosen variant
  • Product image sticks to the top of the screen
  • Minimalist design, only offers what you need

What We Didn’t Like

  • No sticky “Buy Now” button
  • Could have used trust icons and more social proof
  • Lacks color and general creativity
Marucci baseball bat

Osprey

What We Liked

  • Interactive and informational “Special Features” section
  • Create upsell and cross-sell section
  • Excellent sticky header with navigation and “Buy Now” button

What We Didn’t Like

  • Extra-long review section
  • Product images could have been more unique between varients
  • Large empty side columns that could have been used to expand the brand’s story, which the page lacks
Osprey backpack

Band Olufsen

What We Liked

  • Social proof from experts
  • Great use of sticky buttons and headers, awesome use of upsells throughout the page in relevant sections
  • Awesome product photos and videos

What We Didn’t Like

  • Could style their H tags better
  • No “on-page” FAQ
  • No customer reviews
Band Olufsen speaker

Leatherman

What We Liked

  • Excellent product images
  • The “Tools”, “Features” & ”Specs” section is interactive, intuitive, and informational
  • Community engagement with @leathermantools in their Instagram feed

What We Didn’t Like

  • The review section is large, also the highlight review section is redundant
  • No story being told
  • No sticky anything (besides chat)
Leatherman multitool

SodaStream

What We Liked

  • Show’s retail partners
  • The product description is not just a paragraph of text but is broken up into easily digestible points
  • Compare section is nice

What We Didn’t Like

  • Excessive white space
  • No user appeal (no story, no benefit
  • Unorganized / no flow to it
Soda Stream product

Herman Miller

What We Liked

  • Out of the box use of typography
  • Great use of video
  • Lots of detailed information with great images to go with it

What We Didn’t Like

  • Product details drop-down is automatically open, creating a large wall of plain text
  • Inconsistent text alignment
  • The product Q&A section and review section should have been a drop-down
Herman Miller chair product page

HURU

What We Liked

  • Good use of upselling
  • Explain the product well through informative images and descriptions
  • Nice cart functionality, sticky add to cart on the bottom lets you add to the cart while remaining on the page

What We Didn’t Like

  • The review section should be lower, customers are used to it being lower
  • CTA has no color, but they do have a cool animation
  • The review section could have been minimized
Huru backpack

JBL

What We Liked

  • Best sticky checkout we’ve seen so far
  • Great use of brand colors
  • Great comparison section

What We Didn’t Like

  • Feature slider is not great, inconsistent color, poor next button
  • Buttons on the page bring you to a separate page
  • Redundant support sections
JBL earbuds product page

Corsair

What We Liked

  • Sticky buttons, but the sticky header disappears when you scroll down to provide maximum real estate for the rest of the product page. It reappears when you scroll up
  • Excellent use of video throughout the page
  • Scroll animation with high res photos and CTAs keeps the user engaged

What We Didn’t Like

  • Boring above the fold area when compared to the rest of the page
  • No upsells or cross-sell section
  • Slow navigation through the photo gallery
Corsair keyboard

UgMonk

What We Liked

  • G
  • Good use of gifs, rather than still images
  • Good use of upsells and cross-sells
  • Good use of Social Proof

What We Didn’t Like

  • Images are redundant
  • Reviewing the product could be better (brings you to the bottom with no fast way back up)
  • No way to purchase product quickly or at any point on the page
UgMonk notebook product page

Echelon

What We Liked

  • Great sense of community via Instagram
  • Very little wasted white space
  • The sticky header includes a “Buy Now” button

What We Didn’t Like

  • Pitbull section is polarizing
  • The membership section could have used some interactive section
  • On Safari, a scrolling issue of getting stuck occurs when attempting to scroll past a photo gallery
Echelon exercise bike

DJI

What We Liked

  • Great upsells with an attractive “Buy Now” button that has a delivery estimate integration
  • Nice “in the box” section
  • Excellent use of imagery for the “Take a Closer Look” section

What We Didn’t Like

  • No review section with little social proof
  • The “Which is best for you” section should have links to the referenced products
  • Not much story to the product page
DJI drone product page

Brew Dr (20)

What We Liked

  • Maintains color scheme throughout the page, including the stars in the review section. Each product page has a unique color scheme based on the art style
  • Good cross-selling of other products
  • Fantastic social proof throughout the page

What We Didn’t Like

  • No upsells (could sell merch)
  • Extra-long review section
  • No sticky header or “Back to Top” button
Brew Dr kombucha product page

Cuts

What We Liked

  • The product selection section is diverse
  • Great social pressure, they even have their own hashtag
  • Their video looks seamlessly blends into the page

What We Didn’t Like

  • Unnecessarily large review section
  • No story/emotional ties to product
  • No sticky “Buy Now” buttons or ability to jump to the top
Cuts shirt

Alloi

What We Liked

  • Neat animated social proof stats
  • Can minimize review section
  • FAQ section is easy to read and tucks away nicely

What We Didn’t Like

  • Engineered to perfection section could be interactive
  • Product image “next” and “previous” buttons change position based on image, when selecting different colors, images don’t snap to the correct color
  • Misuse of underlining content/text that does not link to anything
Alloi phone case

Plot Devices

What We Liked

  • Pleasing page design
  • The tone of the copy is relaxed
  • Nicely integrated videos and images

What We Didn’t Like

  • No social proof
  • Not interactive when it could be and could use more animations
  • No upsell
Plot Devices notebook product page

Darn Tough

What We Liked

  • Customization options are reflected in the product images.
  • Fantastic storytelling told by the brand’s unappologeticly abbrasive voice.
  • Great use of instagram social proof

What We Didn’t Like

  • No sticky “Buy Now” button
  • No upsells
  • Massive review section
Darn Tough sock product page

Conclusion

Now that you’ve finished flipping through all of our favorite product page examples, it may be more apparent as to what differentiates a good user experience from a bad one. While you’re now equipped with the knowledge to create great product pages, don’t pull a Captain Ahab and spend your whole life looking for the perfect product page. We’ll save you the hassle, there isn’t one. Just be mindful of your visitor’s time and internet expertise so you can exceed their expectations.

If you feel like you need some extra guidance or if this is all too overwhelming, stop hesitating on your dreams and reach out to our team of product page experts at WebCitz today!

Disclaimer: WebCitz, LLC does not warrant or make any representations concerning the accuracy, likely results, or reliability of the information found on this page or on any web sites linked to from this page. This blog article was written by Matt H in his or her personal capacity. The opinion(s) expressed in this article are the author's own and may not reflect the opinion(s) of WebCitz, LLC.